Spatial Concepts
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NEW: Download and print Spatial Concepts pages.
You have always been able to use our online pages at home or in the classroom for free. Now you can purchase, download, and print a pdf file containing all the online illustrations and text plus 15 more pages illustrating 24 new concepts, all presented in a useful 8.5x11 inch page format for only $4.99. Preview and learn more on our Meddybemps Store page.

Over, Under, In, and Out

One of our goals as parents is to help our children learn the ideas and information which help them understand the world around them. The words that define relationships in space are vitally important because they are part of the basic framework for future learning. Children pick up many of these words in daily interactions but they may not understand others.

A child needs to understand the concept of "beside" before he/she can move on to recognizing and repeating patterns. "Behind" and "in front of" are used by parents and teachers throughout the day. How often have you told your child to look "under" a piece of furniture to find a lost object? Use the links below to discover which spatial concepts your child knows and which ones he/she may need more practice with in order to really internalize.

There are steps to truly understanding a concept. The first step is for you to receive correct feedback from your child when you have used the word. Begin by looking at "On and In (1)" and ask, "What animal is 'on' the dog house?"

To help your child progress even further, you can demonstrate these relationships with objects in your home. We have also included a page of animals for you to print and cut out to use. You could take the dog and ask your child to place it "on" the table. If they can do this, they have learned to follow a direction using the word. This is the second step in internalizing the concept.

To check and see if your child understands the concept and can use the word without prompting, let them place the dog on an object and tell you where it is. When a child can use the word in everyday activities, you will have helped them learn one more vital concept. Feels great, doesn't it?

Make these concepts come alive. Print out our animals page. Help your child cut, fold, and tape the animals together. Encourage her or him to move the animals around and describe their spatial relationships.

For plain old coloring fun, here are drawings of our Dog, Cat, Birds, and Turtle.

Animal Cut Outs Dog House Birds Big and Small Moveable Animals Spatial Concepts Pages Meddybemps Store Page A Game of Opposites How Long Is That Train? Locomotives Big and Small

Over and Under 2 Behind and In Front 1 Under Inside and Outside Over and Under 1 Down Beside On and In 2 Over Up Behind and In Front 2 On and In 1 Small, Smaller, Smallest Apart Top, Middle, and Bottom Near and Far Around Above and Below Big, Bigger, Biggest Together Top and Bottom Empty and Full Between Upside-Down

1998, 2000, 2013 Jerry Jindrich. All rights reserved. Revised 8/10/2013.



After you explore Spatial Concepts, discover more of Meddybemps.com. There are hundreds of pages of engaging activities and original stories created to help young children build learning skills in a playful environment.

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